Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect many different organs and tissues in the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, and lungs

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect many different organs and tissues in the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, and lungs. It occurs when the immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues, leading to inflammation and tissue damage.[12]

SLE is relatively rare, affecting approximately 0.1% to 0.2% of the population worldwide.[13] However, it is more common in certain populations, including women, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Asians.[14] The disease can occur at any age, but it is most often diagnosed in people between the ages of 15 and 45.[15]

The symptoms of SLE can vary widely from person to person and can also change over time. Some common symptoms include fatigue, fever, joint pain and stiffness, skin rashes, hair loss, and sensitivity to light.[16] In severe cases, SLE can cause organ damage and life-threatening complications.[17]

There is currently no cure for SLE, but there are treatments available that can help manage symptoms and prevent complications. These include anti-inflammatory medications, immunosuppressive drugs, and lifestyle changes such as getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.[18]

We are committed to developing innovative treatments for SLE, a complex autoimmune disease that affects millions of people worldwide.

[12] Lupus Foundation of America. What is lupus? Retrieved from https://www.lupus.org/resources/what-is-lupus

[13] Rees F, Doherty M, Grainge MJ, Lanyon P, Zhang W. The worldwide incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review of epidemiological studies. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Feb 1;56(2):194-205. doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/kew335. PMID: 27789666.

[14] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lupus. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/lupus/facts/index.html

[15] Lupus Foundation of America. Who gets lupus? Retrieved from https://www.lupus.org/resources/who-gets-lupus

[16] Mayo Clinic. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/systemic-lupus-erythematosus/symptoms-causes/syc-20365789

[17] American College of Rheumatology. What is lupus? Retrieved from https://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Lupus

[18] Lupus Foundation of America. How is lupus treated? Retrieved from https://www.lupus.org/resources/how-is-lupus-treated

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